Dietary Supplements and Herbs

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 7 of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Helpby Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

  • Minerals
  • Enzymes and sulfates
  • Essential fatty acids
  • DMG
  • Melatonin
  • Probiotics
  • Octocosanol
  • Lecithin
  • Herbal neurological remedies
  • Herbal antibiotics
  • Sphingolin
  • Evaluating supplement claims

Support and Advocacy

The following excerpt is taken from Appendix B of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

  • National autism organizations
  • Online support groups
  • Related conditions
  • General special needs
  • Legal advocacy

Supplement Reference

The following excerpt is taken from Appendix F of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

This resource expands on what’s known about herbal remedies, nutritional supplements, some brand-name “natural” remedies or supplements, and a few over-the-counter medications that you may hear about in connection with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Because medications have not been proven to cure or reliably treat all cases and symptoms of autistic spectrum disorders, many people are interested in alternative medicine.

Stresses on Families

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 10 of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Understanding the Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

  • Withdrawal and overinvolvement
  • Burnout and respite
  • Resentment
  • Genetic blame
  • Parental neuropsychiatric problems
  • Siblings
  • Lack of family support

Books and Other Resources

The following excerpt is taken from Appendix A of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

The books, pamphlets, and other resources listed here can help you further explore areas of interest related to autistic spectrum disorders. We have included addresses for printed materials that are not usually available in stores or libraries; otherwise, you should be able to find these items in your local library or via interlibrary loan, or be able to purchase them in regular or online bookstores.

Research and Testing Facilities

 

The following excerpt is taken from Appendix C of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

The establishments and practitioners in this list have been compiled from a variety of sources, including parent recommendations, ASD support groups, and official government documents on health care. We do not imply endorsement of their medical or therapeutic approaches by including them here.

Record Keeping

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 10 of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Understanding the Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

Time is money, and there’s no worse waste of both than losing that all-important referral slip or medical report. File every single piece of paper you get from your doctors, therapists, insurance company, service agencies, and school. This includes assessments, evaluations, diagnostic reports, report cards, test results, IFSPs, IEPs, etc. Be especially sure to save copies of your own correspondence. You can be sure that you’ll need it later, if only to impress some recalcitrant official with the depth of your organizational abilities.

Other Interventions

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 7 of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Helpby Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

  • Allergy treatments
  • Eye therapies
  • Bodywork
  • Multifaceted approaches
  • Evaluating alternative interventions

Allergy treatments

Allergies also have an impact on dietary choices. About 5 percent of all children have food allergies, but the rate of both food allergies and food sensitivities among people with autistic spectrum disorders appears to be higher. The most common causes of food allergy are milk, eggs, peanuts, soy, nuts, fish, and shellfish.

Basic Neurology

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 1 of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Helpby Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

The brain is the most complex and least understood organ in the body. It is the focal point of the central nervous system (CNS), which also includes the nerves of the spine. The CNS receives, processes, and sends billions of signals every day by way of chemicals and electrical impulses. Neurologists (physicians who specialize in studying and treating brain diseases and disorders) are only starting to identify how these chemicals and power surges work, and what we know right now is woefully inadequate for helping when these processes go awry.

Medications for Pervasive Developmental Disorders

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter Five of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Helpby Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has never approved a drug for the treatment of autism or PDDs, most of the medical treatments currently available for PDDs are drugs. Drugs are prescribed to address specific PDD symptoms, such as difficulty in focusing, hyperactivity, self-abusive behavior,