Research and Testing Facilities

 

The following excerpt is taken from Appendix C of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

The establishments and practitioners in this list have been compiled from a variety of sources, including parent recommendations, ASD support groups, and official government documents on health care. We do not imply endorsement of their medical or therapeutic approaches by including them here.

Record Keeping

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 10 of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Understanding the Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

Time is money, and there’s no worse waste of both than losing that all-important referral slip or medical report. File every single piece of paper you get from your doctors, therapists, insurance company, service agencies, and school. This includes assessments, evaluations, diagnostic reports, report cards, test results, IFSPs, IEPs, etc. Be especially sure to save copies of your own correspondence. You can be sure that you’ll need it later, if only to impress some recalcitrant official with the depth of your organizational abilities.

Other Interventions

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 7 of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Helpby Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

Allergy treatments

Allergies also have an impact on dietary choices. About 5 percent of all children have food allergies, but the rate of both food allergies and food sensitivities among people with autistic spectrum disorders appears to be higher. The most common causes of food allergy are milk, eggs, peanuts, soy, nuts, fish, and shellfish.

Basic Neurology

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 1 of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Helpby Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

The brain is the most complex and least understood organ in the body. It is the focal point of the central nervous system (CNS), which also includes the nerves of the spine. The CNS receives, processes, and sends billions of signals every day by way of chemicals and electrical impulses. Neurologists (physicians who specialize in studying and treating brain diseases and disorders) are only starting to identify how these chemicals and power surges work, and what we know right now is woefully inadequate for helping when these processes go awry.

Medications for Pervasive Developmental Disorders

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter Five of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Helpby Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has never approved a drug for the treatment of autism or PDDs, most of the medical treatments currently available for PDDs are drugs. Drugs are prescribed to address specific PDD symptoms, such as difficulty in focusing, hyperactivity, self-abusive behavior,

Medication Reference Tables

Note: The following tables are part of a Medical Reference article. Please see the full article for additional information relating to these tables.

The following excerpt is taken from Appendix E of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

The latest data on medications for PDD symptoms

The following three tables summarize what’s currently known about medications that address some symptoms of autism and other ASDs. They were adapted with permission from “New Findings on the Causes and Treatment of Autism” by Dr. Mark Potenza and Dr. Christopher McDougle, a 1997 article published in the medical journalCNS Spectrums (Copyright © 1997, Medical Broadcast Limited). They are based on information from the latest studies of

Medication Reference

The following excerpt is taken from Appendix E of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

This appendix provides more information about medications that may be prescribed to treat specific symptoms associated with autistic spectrum disorders. Being listed in this appendix does not mean that a particular medication is recommended for these disorders, but it’s important to know as much as possible about drugs you may hear about or be prescribed.

Insurance and PDDs

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 8 of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Helpby Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

Pervasive developmental disorders are not easily treated with medications alone. One-on-one therapeutic intervention, and often major lifestyle changes such as special diets, should be part of a well-rounded treatment plan. Treatment will be a long-term affair. Unfortunately for patients and their families, paying for this amount of healthcare is expensive. Insurance should help, as it does for other major medical expenses, but as we shall see, that’s not always the case.

Getting a Diagnosis: Starting with a Pediatrician

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 3 of Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Understanding the Diagnosis & Getting Help Mitzi Waltz, copyright 2002 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call 1-800-998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.

Usually, the first person to hear the concerns of a young child’s parents is a pediatrician. In this age of managed care, the pediatrician takes on more importance than ever: Not only is she the doctor who knows the most about how a particular child’s development compares to the norm, but she is almost always the primary care provider (PCP) designated by health insurance plans. She generally serves as a gatekeeper to more advanced care, making referrals to medical and therapeutic specialists as needed.

Direct and Indirect Financial Support for Families

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 11 of Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Finding a Diagnosis and Getting Help by Mitzi Waltz, copyright 1999 by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. For book orders/information, call (800) 998-9938. Permission is granted to print and distribute this excerpt for noncommercial use as long as the above source is included. The information in this article is meant to educate and should not be used as an alternative for professional medical care.